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Snacking in college

Page history last edited by Helena Baert 11 years, 10 months ago

First Author: KellyP

Second Author: Celeste Otto


 Snacking in College

 

     Snacks are some of America's favorite foods!  Being a college student, snacks can become a student's main meal.[1]  Breakfast most likely becomes a thing of the past and convenience foods now take over.[2]  Everyone has heard of the famous "Freshmen 15".  This is due to stress, a sedentary lifestyle, and a change in food intake and diet pattern.[3]  By monitoring your diet and gaining knowledge on proper snacking, you can avoid gaining those "Freshmen 15".

 

Factors that affect meal and snack patterns:[4]

  • Skipping meals
  • Work and class schedules
  • Lifestyle changes
  • Peer pressure
  • Finances
  • Erratic eating patterns

 

College students tend to have little variety in their diets, and therefore turn to high fat snacks.  A common error is misjudging serving size, in turn, eating more than they think they are eating[5].  One solution might be smart snacking, it takes some planning but it will be well worth it in the end.  Dietitians suggest snacking periodically throughout the day.  This helps make the most out of our metabolism and to keep our energy levels consistent.  They also suggest that college students avoid foods that are high in salt, fat, calories, and sugar[6].

 

3 nutrients that provide calories:[7]

  • Carbohydrates (grains, fruits, vegetables, and milk[8])
  • Proteins (meat, fish, poultry, eggs, milk products, legumes, and nuts[9])
  • Fats (animal foods, grains, nuts, seeds, fish, and vegetables[10])

                                                                                                    

 

Other vitamins and minerals needed in the diet:[11]

  • Dietary fiber (wheat bran, cereals, grains, legumes, and oats[12])
  • Vitamin C (citrus fruits, strawberries, and other fruits and vegetables[13])
  • Calcium (milk and milk products, fortified orange juice and breads, and green leafy vegetables[14]
  • Iron (meat, poultry, fortified grain products, dark green vegetables, and dried fruit[15])
  • Zinc (whole grains, meat, eggs, liver, and seafood, especially oysters[16])

                                                                                                           

 

Recommendations for Improvement:[17]

  • Get 8 hours of sleep (sleep deprivation is connected with weight problems)
  • Avoid skipping meals (helps to avoid overeating at later meals)
  • Eat breakfast (helps with concentration)
  • Manage portion sizes (also helps with overeating)
  • Drink water throughout the day (it is calorie free)
  • Eat fruit throughout the day (contributes to fiber, vitamins, and mineral intake)
  • Exercise regularly (helps manage stress, burn calories, and promotes mental and physical stamina)
  • Become familiar with campus eating environments (most campuses have a variety of choices)
  • Try low-calorie, low-fat, and vegetarian choices (incorporate these into daily diet)
  • Keep low-fat, low-calories snacks on hand (makes for good late night snacks)

                                                                                                    

 

 

Healthy Snacks to Choose On the Go:[18]

  • Fresh fruit
  • Raw vegetables (i.e. carrots or cherry tomatoes)
  • Pumpernickel bagel with peanut butter (good breakfast choice)
  • Low fat yogurt (easy to take on the way to class)
  • English muffin with cheese (another great idea for breakfast)
  • Nuts or sunflower seeds
  • Plain popcorn (no salt to keep it nutritious)
  • Whole wheat tortilla wrap (add tuna salad or salmon)

                                                                                                        

By taking the information above and applying it to your daily diet, you can snack healthy and avoid those extra pounds.  Remember to choose those foods low in fat and low in calories.  There are many more foods that can added to the list of snacks to choose.  Just keep in mind the Food Guide Pyramid to ensure that you are receiving your daily allowances of fruits, vegetables, meats, dairy, and grains.

 

 

 

www.mypyramid.gov

 

Healthy Eating Tips:  Eating Healthy Snacks

 

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fitnessconcepts.pbwiki.com/KellyP

 

Footnotes

  1. http://media.www.jhunewsletter.com/media/storage/paper932/news/2001/10/12/DiningGuideonYourOwn/Snack.The.College.Students.Main.Meal-2247360.shtml
  2. http://media.www.jhunewsletter.com/media/storage/paper932/news/2001/10/12/DiningGuideonYourOwn/Snack.The.College.Students.Main.Meal-2247360.shtml
  3. http://www.faqs.org/nutrition/Ca-De/College-Students-Diets-of.html
  4. http://www.faqs.org/nutrition/Ca-De/College-Students-Diets-of.html
  5. http://www.faqs.org/nutrition/Ca-De/College-Students-Diets-of.html
  6. http://articles.directorym.com/Healthy_snacking_College_Park_MD-r938411-College_Park_MD.html
  7. http://www.faqs.org/nutrition/Ca-De/College-Students-Diets-of.html
  8. Fahey, T. D., Insel P. M. & Roth, W. T. (2009), Fit & Well: Core concepts and labs in physical fitness and wellness. McGraw-Hill, New York: New York. (pg.223)
  9. Fahey, T. D., Insel P. M. & Roth, W. T. (2009), Fit & Well: Core concepts and labs in physical fitness and wellness. McGraw-Hill, New York: New York. (pg. 223)
  10. Fahey, T. D., Insel P. M. & Roth, W. T. (2009), Fit & Well: Core concepts and labs in physical fitness and wellness. McGraw-Hill, New York: New York. (pg. 223)
  11. http://www.faqs.org/nutrition/Ca-De/College-Students-Diets-of.html
  12. Fahey, T. D., Insel P. M. & Roth, W. T. (2009), Fit & Well: Core concepts and labs in physical fitness and wellness. McGraw-Hill, New York: New York. (pg. 231)
  13. Fahey, T. D., Insel P. M. & Roth, W. T. (2009), Fit & Well: Core concepts and labs in physical fitness and wellness. McGraw-Hill, New York: New York. (pg. 233)
  14. Fahey, T. D., Insel P. M. & Roth, W. T. (2009), Fit & Well: Core concepts and labs in physical fitness and wellness. McGraw-Hill, New York: New York. (pg. 234)
  15. Fahey, T. D., Insel P. M. & Roth, W. T. (2009), Fit & Well: Core concepts and labs in physical fitness and wellness. McGraw-Hill, New York: New York. (pg. 234)
  16. Fahey, T. D., Insel P. M. & Roth, W. T. (2009), Fit & Well: Core concepts and labs in physical fitness and wellness. McGraw-Hill, New York: New York. (pg. 234)
  17. http://www.faqs.org/nutrition/Ca-De/College-Students-Diets-of.html
  18. http://articles.directorym.com/Healthy_snacking_College_Park_MD-r938411-College_Park_MD.html

Comments (5)

Shea Gibbs said

at 4:53 pm on Dec 2, 2008

This article was very informative. Now i have a better idea of how to monitor my diet and eat the right snacks!

Jordan Addison Donald said

at 6:25 pm on Dec 2, 2008

I really like the article. I also really liked your opening cartoon picture

Whitney Jones said

at 11:33 am on Dec 3, 2008

Great article! I believe all college students should take this article into consideration.

Marisa Vinson said

at 11:56 am on Dec 3, 2008

Really liked the article, it has a lot of information college students can use!

Shona Feistner said

at 4:52 pm on Dec 3, 2008

Very interesting article. I liked how you gave snack ideas for on the go! That's very beneficial for me!

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